LOVE ALL!
| by @freshprinceofny87 “Hate when I see this happen. Instead of using the bible to help build one another up with love and compassion. We manipulate it, use it out of context, and destroy our brothers and sisters with condemnation. Yes we all agree sin against God is wrong on any level… They are all equal in his eyes… If you tell a “small white lie” you are just as corrupt as someone having sex before marriage… SIN IS SIN… Proverbs 27:17 says ;As iron sharpens iron,
so a friend sharpens a friend. Let us love on one another as Christ loved the church”

LOVE ALL!
| by @freshprinceofny87 “Hate when I see this happen. Instead of using the bible to help build one another up with love and compassion. We manipulate it, use it out of context, and destroy our brothers and sisters with condemnation. Yes we all agree sin against God is wrong on any level… They are all equal in his eyes… If you tell a “small white lie” you are just as corrupt as someone having sex before marriage… SIN IS SIN… Proverbs 27:17 says ;As iron sharpens iron,
so a friend sharpens a friend. Let us love on one another as Christ loved the church”

Passionate and Protective

God isn’t just mildly interested in the hearts of human beings. He’s fiercely protective of them.

This wasn’t Jesus’ first time at the temple. His parents accidentally left Him there once when He was a boy, and He had often taught there at times during His ministry (Matt.26:55). But this visit was different. This time He surprised a temple audience with more than His words. This time He grew fiercely angry at the activities in the courtyard.

Fierce anger isn’t what we expect from Jesus. But God is passionate about His people, and His people were at the mercy of mercenaries at the temple. That had to stop. So Jesus turned tables, drove out the profiteers, and quoted phrases from the prophets to prove His point. God’s temple is a place of prayer for the nations, not a business venture.

This event clearly teaches us that God opposes deception and greed, but there’s a much deeper message in it. The intensity of Jesus’ reaction reflects the heart of the Father for His people. The passion He demonstrated at the temple wasn’t about the building; it was about the worshipers who have gathered and, on a larger scale, the nations they represented. Apparently, God isn’t just mildly interested in the hearts of human beings. He’s fiercely protective of them. He’s zealous for our worship and jealous for our love.

When Solomon dedicated the first temple in Jerusalem, priests fell on their faces as God powerfully filled the building with His presence. The building was holy ground, a place of purity and prayer. Centuries later when Jesus overthrew the money changers’ tables, He demonstrated God’s intense passion for this same holy ground. But what about now? Worshipers no longer gather at a temple in Jerusalem. Where does God direct His passion?

To us. In the New Testament, God’s people become the temple of His presence. The building gives way to the body. If Jesus could be so profoundly provoked over a stone temple, how much more fervent is He about His body of believers? The purity and prayerfulness of His dwelling place deeply matter to Him. He enters our hearts with zeal to drive out unholy influences and make us His own.
(Mark 11:15-17)

Passionate and Protective

God isn’t just mildly interested in the hearts of human beings. He’s fiercely protective of them.

This wasn’t Jesus’ first time at the temple. His parents accidentally left Him there once when He was a boy, and He had often taught there at times during His ministry (Matt.26:55). But this visit was different. This time He surprised a temple audience with more than His words. This time He grew fiercely angry at the activities in the courtyard.

Fierce anger isn’t what we expect from Jesus. But God is passionate about His people, and His people were at the mercy of mercenaries at the temple. That had to stop. So Jesus turned tables, drove out the profiteers, and quoted phrases from the prophets to prove His point. God’s temple is a place of prayer for the nations, not a business venture.

This event clearly teaches us that God opposes deception and greed, but there’s a much deeper message in it. The intensity of Jesus’ reaction reflects the heart of the Father for His people. The passion He demonstrated at the temple wasn’t about the building; it was about the worshipers who have gathered and, on a larger scale, the nations they represented. Apparently, God isn’t just mildly interested in the hearts of human beings. He’s fiercely protective of them. He’s zealous for our worship and jealous for our love.

When Solomon dedicated the first temple in Jerusalem, priests fell on their faces as God powerfully filled the building with His presence. The building was holy ground, a place of purity and prayer. Centuries later when Jesus overthrew the money changers’ tables, He demonstrated God’s intense passion for this same holy ground. But what about now? Worshipers no longer gather at a temple in Jerusalem. Where does God direct His passion?

To us. In the New Testament, God’s people become the temple of His presence. The building gives way to the body. If Jesus could be so profoundly provoked over a stone temple, how much more fervent is He about His body of believers? The purity and prayerfulness of His dwelling place deeply matter to Him. He enters our hearts with zeal to drive out unholy influences and make us His own.
(Mark 11:15-17)

When you sit back to do nothing, you are not doing nothing. You are actively engaging your will in a decision to sit back. And if that is the way you handle sin or temptation in your life, it is blatant disobedience, because we are commanded to wage a good warfare (1 Timothy 1:18) and to resist the devil (James 4:7) and strive for holiness (Hebrews 12:14).

This verse says that it is by the power of God that we will fulfill our good resolve and our work of faith. But this does not nullify the meaning of the word “resolve” and the word “work.” Part of the whole process of walking worthy of God’s call is the active engagement of our will in resolving to do righteousness.

If you have lingering sin in your life, or if you keep neglecting some good deed, just because you have been waiting around to be saved without a fight, you are compounding your disobedience. God will never appear with power in your will in any other form than a good resolve that you make and keep.

So people who believe in the sovereignty of God must not fear to engage their wills in the struggle for holiness. “Strive to enter by the narrow door; for many I tell you will seek to enter and will not be able” (Luke 13:24).

When you sit back to do nothing, you are not doing nothing. You are actively engaging your will in a decision to sit back. And if that is the way you handle sin or temptation in your life, it is blatant disobedience, because we are commanded to wage a good warfare (1 Timothy 1:18) and to resist the devil (James 4:7) and strive for holiness (Hebrews 12:14).

This verse says that it is by the power of God that we will fulfill our good resolve and our work of faith. But this does not nullify the meaning of the word “resolve” and the word “work.” Part of the whole process of walking worthy of God’s call is the active engagement of our will in resolving to do righteousness.

If you have lingering sin in your life, or if you keep neglecting some good deed, just because you have been waiting around to be saved without a fight, you are compounding your disobedience. God will never appear with power in your will in any other form than a good resolve that you make and keep.

So people who believe in the sovereignty of God must not fear to engage their wills in the struggle for holiness. “Strive to enter by the narrow door; for many I tell you will seek to enter and will not be able” (Luke 13:24).